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Yellowstone National Park Plate Boundaries

Yellowstone National Park Plate Boundaries

These deposits provide just the right soil and drainages conditions for meadows like Hayden Valley, in the heart of Yellowstone, where bison, elk, bear, waterfowl and other wildlife thrive. Mud Volcano Photo courtesy of Robert J. Near their boundary, the plates can lock together for centuries, then suddenly let go as a giant earthquake.

Convergent Plate Boundaries—Subduction Zones

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Two parallel mountain ranges commonly develop above such a subduction zone — a coastal range consisting of sedimentary strata and hard rock lifted out of the sea accretionary wedgeand a volcanic range farther inland volcanic arc. Ancient magma chamber rocks can be exposed if subduction stops and the volcanoes erode away. Subduction Zone—Two Parallel Mountain Ranges An accretionary wedge forms between the converging plates as material is scraped off the subducting plate.

A forearc basin develops in the low area between the two mountain ranges. The rising water melts rock in its path, forming a volcanic arc on the overrriding plate. Near their boundary, the plates can lock together for centuries, then suddenly let go as a giant earthquake. If the seafloor rises or falls, giant sea waves a tsunami can form.

Lillie, Wells Creek Publishers, 75 pp. Many National Park Service sites are found in active and ancient subduction zones. Visitors can witness mountains as they are forming, and sometimes experience the accompanying earthquake and volcanic activity. Parks in the Cascadia Subduction Zone dramatically display the two distinct mountain ranges — the Coast Range just above where the Juan de Fuca Plate begins to subduct, and the volcanic Cascade Range farther inland, where the top of the plate is deeper.

Sites in the Sierra Nevada Mountains reveal the eroded roots of an ancient volcanic range that formed when the subduction zone extended much farther south.

And very large parks in the Southern Alaska Subduction Zone display magnificent mountains, rock layers and active volcanoes that tell the story ongoing plate convergence along the North Pacific Coast. NPS photo. Mount Rainier National Park, Washington Mount Rainier is a 14, foot 4, meter volcano in the Cascade Range developed above the place where the subducting Juan de Fuca Plate reaches sufficient depth to release hot fluids into the overriding North American Plate.

Photo courtesy of Robert J. Yosemite National Park, California The light-colored granite rocks are the cooled remnants of magma chambers that fed ancient volcanoes when the subduction zone extended through California and into Mexico. Cascadia Subduction Zone The Glacier National Park To Great Falls Mt Northwest is an exciting place to observe geologic processes in action.

National Park Service sites in the Coastal Ranges of Washington, Oregon and northern California contain rugged mountains of rocks that were manufactured in the ocean, then scraped off the plate and lifted out of the sea. But parks in the Cascade Mountains — within the same subduction zone — are dramatically different. They contain explosive volcanoes formed as fluids rise from the top of the subducting plate and generate magma as they melt their way to the surface.

And as time ticks on, the region awaits sudden release of energy locked between the converging plates as a devastating earthquake. The Cascadia Subduction Zone, extending from northern California through western Oregon and Washington to southern British Columbia, is a type of convergent plate boundary.

Two parallel mountain ranges have been forming as a result of the Juan de Fuca Plate subducting beneath the edge of North America. Near the western edge of the continent, the Juan de Fuca Plate plunges downward and some of the layers of Yellowstone National Park Plate Boundaries crust and ocean sediments are scraped off the top and squeezed upward as the Olympic Mountains and other coastal ranges.

Farther east the Juan de Fuca Plate descends deeper and deeper. The rocks on top of the plate are metamorphosed due to the great temperatures and pressures at those depths. A by-product of Yellowstone National Park Plate Boundaries metamorphism is the release…

Plate Boundaries and Hotspot Demonstration

Fun Facts About Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

When magma from the plume head reaches the surface, it flows across the surface as basalt. Another, Wrangell-St. Mazama, violently erupted 7, years ago.