Tag Archives: Matanzas

Fort Matanzas National Park

Fort Matanzas National Park

See what a soldier carried in his backpack. School Group Reservations: School and other groups are welcome. Fees: There are no fees to enter the park or to take the ferry to the fort. These programs can vary in physical exertion from a stationary program in the picnic area, a short walk on one of the park’s nature trails or a 2 mile hike along the park’s beaches.

A Reminder of an Earlier Time

Zion National Park Lodging Cabins

Display of soldier personal items and a box of artillery shots. See what a soldier carried in his Fort Matanzas National Park. Get an up close look at a Spanish flintlock musket and watch it fire. Look into the shot locker and learn about the many uses of cannons of the time. On some days we also demonstrate bullet making over a fire.

Musket firing and bullet making demonstrations are subject to weather conditions and staffing. Please check the calendar of events for upcoming activities and times. If you’re interested in volunteering at the park and joining our re-enactors click HERE. These programs can vary in physical exertion from a stationary program in the picnic area, a short walk on one of Fort Matanzas National Park park’s nature trails or a 2 mile hike along the park’s beaches.

Check the above calendar for specific details and dates for these programs. Last updated: October 29,

Alerts In Effect

Campgrounds Near Great Smoky Mountains National Park

School Group Reservations: School and other groups are welcome. Fees: There are no fees to enter the park or to take the ferry to the fort. Please call the park at to make a reservation.

Matanzas National Park

Matanzas National Park

When it dries it turns into a gray mud. The park features thousands of these tree islands amid sloughs—which often form the shape of a teardrop when seen from above see park map because of the slowly moving water around them—but they can also be found in pineland and mangroves. South Florida slash pines are uniquely adapted to promote fire by dropping a large amount of dried pine needles and shedding dry bark. They are called Dry owing to the absence of surface fresh water on the island.

Dry Tortugas National Park

Acadia National Park Summer Jobs

Hydrography[ edit ] While they are common in the northern portion of Floridano underground springs feed water into the Everglades system. An underground reservoir called the Floridan aquifer lies about 1, feet m below the surface of South Florida. Water evaporating from the Everglades becomes rain over metropolitan areas, providing Matanzas National Park fresh water supply for the region.

Water also flows into the park after falling as rain to the north onto the watersheds of the Kissimmee River and other sources of Lake Okeechobee, to appear in the Everglades days later. As Florida’s population began to grow significantly and urban areas near the Everglades were developed, proponents of the park’s establishment faced difficulty in persuading the federal government and the people of Florida that the subtle and constantly shifting ecosystems in the Everglades were just as worthy of protection.

Freshwater sloughs and marl prairies[ edit ] Alligators thrive in freshwater sloughs and marl prairies.

Sawgrass growing to a height of 6 feet 1. Excellent feeding locations for birds, sloughs in the Everglades attract a great variety of waders such as heronsegretsroseate spoonbills Platalea ajajaibises and brown pelicans Pelecanus occidentalisas well as limpkins Aramus guarauna and snail kites that eat apple snailswhich in turn feed on the sawgrass.

The sloughs’ availability of fish, amphibians, and young birds attract a variety of freshwater turtles, alligator Alligator mississippiensiswater moccasin Agkistrodon piscivorus conantiand eastern diamondback rattlesnake Crotalus adamanteus.

Algae and other microscopic organisms form periphytonwhich attaches to limestone. When it dries it turns into a gray mud. Marl prairies are usually under water from three to seven months of the year, whereas sloughs may remain submerged for longer than nine months and sometimes remain under water from one year to the next. Sawgrass may dominate sloughs, creating a monoculture.

Other grasses, such as muhly grass Muhlenbergia filipes and Glacier National Park To Great Falls Mt water plants can be found in marl prairies. Marl prairies may go dry in some parts of the year; alligators play a vital role in maintaining life in remote parts of the Everglades by burrowing in the mud during the dry season, creating pools of water where fish and amphibians survive from one year to the next.

Alligator holes also attract other animals who congregate to feed on smaller prey. When the region floods again during the wet season, the fish and amphibians which were sustained in the alligator holes then repopulate freshwater marl prairies. They rise several inches above the grass-covered river and are dominated by diverse plant life Matanzas National Park of subtropical and tropical trees, such as large southern live oaks Quercus virginiana. Trees often form canopies under which animals thrive amongst scrub bushes of wild coffee Psychotriawhite indigoberry Randia aculeatapoisonwood Metopium toxiferum and saw palmetto Serenoa repens.

The park features thousands of these tree islands amid sloughs—which often form the shape of a teardrop when seen from above see park map because of the slowly moving water around them—but they can also be found in pineland and mangroves.

Trees in the Everglades, including wild tamarind Lysiloma latisiliquum and gumbo-limbo Bursera simarubararely grow higher than 50 feet 15 m because of wind, fire, and climate. The plant growth around the hammock base is nearly impenetrable; beneath the canopy hammocks is an ideal habitat for animals.

Reptiles such as various species of snake and anole Matanzas National Park amphibians such as the American green tree frogHyla cinerealive in the hardwood hammocks. Birds such as barred owls Strix variawoodpeckersnorthern cardinals Cardinalis cardinalisand southern bald eagles Haliaeetus leucocephalus leucocephalus nest in hammock trees.

Mammal species living in…

US National Monuments by State

Qausuittuq National Park

Since then visitation has slowly declined, with an average of about 63, per year in the period from to After a brief sea chase, the Spanish retired south to a site they had earlier reconnoitered, a Timucuan village called Seloy. Everglades National Park features twenty-five species of orchids. Alligator holes also attract other animals who congregate to feed on smaller prey.