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Best Months To Visit Zion National Park

Best Months To Visit Zion National Park

Drive slowly to not pass one by because U-turns are all but impossible. Water falling off the rocks near the Emerald Pools Light waterfalls form as water flows from the upper pools to the middle and lower pools. The view from underneath Weeping Rock 6.

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By Jackie Sills-Dellegrazie 47 Comments This post contains affiliate links which earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. Additionally, The Globetrotting Teacher has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. The Globetrotting Teacher and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers.

The Globetrotting Teacher has also partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Better yet… Are you ready to do some Best Months To Visit Zion National Park things at Zion National Park?

Best Months To Visit Zion National Park the absolute gem of the National Park system, Zion will undoubtedly be an unforgettable experience! The towering red rock, the evergreen trees, and the glittering Virgin River exquisitely come together to create one majestic and formidable landscape. Driving the Zion-Mt. Carmel Scenic Highway is an absolute must. In fact, you should plan to drive it a couple of times.

Prepare yourself for an impressive, incredible, and even imposing drive with monster slabs of gorgeous rock towering over you on all sides. The road winds, dips, and ducks into tunnels for 12 miles.

Traffic moves slowly, as road and weather conditions, the number of cars, and wildlife demands attentive driving. There are no bathrooms or other Best Months To Visit Zion National Park along the route. Drive slowly to not pass one by because U-turns are all but impossible. While stopped, spend time taking in and exploring the terrain. You might even come across a herd of mountain goats grazing on low shrubs and plants!

The herd we came upon had 10 babies! As you drive along the Zion-Mt. Carmel scenic highway, be sure to make Checkerboard Mesa one of your pull-offs. Its light grayish color stands out from the orange layers of sandstone forming the nearby mountains. Not to mention its namesake display of a perfect checkerboard line pattern.

Checkerboard Mesa has its own viewpoint and for good reason. Unlike Arches and Canyonlands National Parks, driving within Zion is largely restricted for much of the year, besides for the scenic road mentioned above.

Along the way, sights like the Court of the Patriarchs and the Virgin River can be seen and photographed from the road or by walking along short paths to scenic viewpoints. Shuttles run frequently in both directions. The hikes listed below can all be accessed from the 9 shuttle stops, except for the Canyon Overlook Trail.

Beginning with the last shuttle stop, Temple of Sinawava, the Riverside Walk is a must. The walk is 2. I found the Riverside Walk to be one of the prettiest spots in Zion. The Narrows is not a trail, but rather a steep canyon through which the Virgin River flows. Much of the hike is done by wading through the river. The day hike is roughly 10 miles out and back, although you can also go out and back for a shorter distance and have equally as memorable of an experience.

If you do the full 10 miles, plan on it taking the full day. To go further, you must get a permit. Unfortunately for us, the Narrows was closed due to heavy spring snow melt. The Rangers expected it to stay closed for several weeks, but I did my Best Months To Visit Zion National Park just in case!

Photo by Christopher. Visiting Zion National Park soon? After capturing a few photos, head toward Weeping Rock and make the short, steep climb. The rock has a constant drip or flow of spring water coming out of it. The view from underneath Weeping Glacier National Park To Great Falls Mt

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With no shuttles and few cars along the Scenic Drive, two wheels is the ultimate way to take it all in along the relatively flat road—and you can stop wherever you want. Not in the winter. This helps alleviate noise and traffic in the canyon and protects the environment. In fact, you should plan to drive it a couple of times.